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HIV Prevention

The Division of Disease Prevention HIV Prevention Program is funded primarily through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additional support is provided through state funding. The CDC grant supports a range of activities that include: counseling and testing, referral and partner counseling and referral services, health education/risk reduction services, public information, a toll-free hotline, capacity building, technical assistance, training, quality assurance, and evaluation.

More than $2,500,000 is provided annually to community-based organizations and health districts to support prevention and community-based HIV testing programs. The Division funds eight grant programs that target the priority populations identified by the Virginia HIV Community Planning Group.

Grant Programs

Click on the links below for descriptions of each grant program.

HIV Prevention Among Communities of Color

AIDS Services and Education Grants

Men who have Sex with Men HIV Prevention Program

African-American Faith Initiative

Community HIV Testing Services

Primary Prevention With People Living with HIV

Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Resources and Linkages for Inmates (CHARLI)

Expanded HIV Testing Grant

Information for HIV Prevention Contractors

Click on the links below for descriptions of these documents and links to them.

Capacity Building, Technical Assistance, and Training

Taxonomy and Intervention Standards

Creating a Common Vocabulary for Modifying a DEBI

HIV Prevention Contractor Guidelines

Rapid HIV Testing Quality Assurance Manual

 

Grant Programs

HIV Prevention Among Communities of Color

First funded in 1988 as the Minority AIDS Projects, this program was reconfigured in 2012 to better reflect the new National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States (2010). Funds are provided for HIV prevention interventions among communities of color at increased risk for HIV infection. Projects are funded in six service areas with the highest HIV/AIDS morbidity among Black and Latino communities. At least 30% of total grant award is for HIV prevention with Black and Latino men who have sex with men. Areas served are: 1) Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, Prince William; 2) Hampton, Peninsula (Newport News); 3) City of Richmond, Henrico, Chesterfield; 4) Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Portsmouth, Chesapeake, Western Tidewater (Suffolk); 5) Crater (Petersburg, Emporia, Hopewell); and 6) City of Roanoke.

AIDS Services and Education Grants

This program is supported by state funding and was created though an act of the Virginia General Assembly in 1989. These grants are intended to support outreach, innovative prevention interventions for hard to reach populations and supportive services for persons living with HIV. Currently these projects are targeting transgender persons.

Men who have Sex with Men HIV Prevention Program

Established in 1998, this grant program was created to address a significant disparity between the impact of the epidemic on gay and bisexual men and the amount of funding being targeted to this community. The program has been expanded twice since 1998 with supplemental funds. Populations targeted include racial/ethnic minorities, young men and men on the down low.

African-American Faith Initiative

Created in 1999, the project grew out of a public call for faith-based HIV programs in minority communities and a series of research and survey projects conducted the Virginia Commonwealth University Community Health Research Initiative on behalf of the Division and the Virginia HIV Community Planning Committee. Through a community-mobilization approach, religious institutions may use funds for clergy training and congregation education around HIV as well as mentoring of other churches in the development of HIV prevention and support programs.

Community HIV Testing Services

This grant program was established in 2001 to provide HIV antibody testing in outreach and non-invasive settings through community-based organizations. In 2006 this program was expanded to include rapid HIV testing in appropriate venues. The focus is on reaching men who have sex with men, injection drug users, the sexual partners of these populations, high risk heterosexuals and incarcerated persons.

Primary Prevention With People Living with HIV

This program, established in 2002, supports primary HIV prevention (prevention of new HIV infections) by working with HIV infected individuals. Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS) is provided to individuals identified as engaging in high-risk behaviors that may transmit HIV, or those with mental health, substance abuse or medication adherence difficulties. Additional strategies include group level interventions and individual counseling.

Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Resources and Linkages for Inmates (CHARLI)

CHARLI, first funded in 2009, is a collaboration between HIV Prevention and HIV Care Services. The purpose of the program is to provide a continuum of HIV services to inmates with 60 days or less to serve in state prisons, local and regional jails. Services include pre-release HIV prevention education, rapid HIV testing, discharge planning and case management for HIV-infected persons, and post-release case management and primary prevention for HIV-infected persons. Additional services may include client support, follow-up on those lost to care and medication adherence counseling.

Expanded HIV Testing Grant

This grant program was established in 2007 to support the CDC recommendation to increase routine testing in clinical settings, with a focus on reaching individuals disproportionately affected by HIV, specifically African-Americans, Latinos, men who have sex with men, and injecting drug users. This program supports testing in clinical settings such as Community Health Centers, hospital emergency departments, correctional facilities, Community Service Boards, free clinics, student health centers, infectious disease clinics, and local health departments. The program also supports integration of services, providing funds for hepatitis and STD testing in addition to HIV testing, and limited testing in non-healthcare settings.

For information on competing for these grant programs please see Funding Opportunities

 

Capacity Building, Technical Assistance and Training

The Community Services Units offers a range of services and workshops to enhance community-based organization infrastructure and delivery of evidence-based HIV prevention interventions.

Training in the following areas is offered periodically:

  • Core Strategies for Street and Community Outreach
  • SISTA (Sisters Informing Sisters About Topics on AIDS)*
  • Healthy Relationships*
  • Voices (Video Opportunities for Innovative Condom Education and Safer Sex)*
  • Grant Writing
  • Board Development
  • Fiscal Management
  • Taking Care of Self While Taking Care of Others
  • Transgender Health
  • Faith-based initiatives
  • Comprehensive HIV Educator training

*Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) curriculum. For a full list of DEBIs and scheduled national training opportunities, see www.effectiveinterventions.org.

Community-based organizations funded by VDH to provide HIV prevention interventions may also access capacity building and technical assistance from a national network of providers through CDC’s Capacity Building Assistance Request Information System (CRIS). CRIS requests must be made through your VDH contract monitor.

 

Taxonomy and Intervention Standards

Funded agencies are expected to describe their interventions using the taxonomy of interventions developed by VDH and the HIV Community Planning Committee. Intervention standards, also developed with input from the Planning Committee, should be used as part of the quality assurance process for staff training, safety and delivery of interventions.

 

Creating a Common Vocabulary for Modifying a DEBI

This document outlines the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidance on how Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Intervention (DEBI) curricula may be modified to be effective for a new population or risk behavior.  It also describes the vocabulary associated with this process such as “adaptation” versus “tailoring.”

 

HIV Prevention Contractor Guidelines

These guidelines contain a broad array of information needed by contractors, including, but not limited to, staff contact information, the quarterly report format, information on data collection for evaluation and monitoring, DEBIs and intervention standards, CDC requirements for materials approval, a sample budget format, and a variety of forms.  Please see the table of contents for additional information.

Here are some of our more commonly requested forms for contractors:

 

Rapid HIV Testing Quality Assurance Manual

This Quality Assurance (QA)manual is the benchmark by which all Division of Disease Prevention-funded HIV testing programs are evaluated and is used in conjunction with the Virginia Facts and Fundamentals training required of all testing staff.  All testing staff are required to familiarize themselves with this manual.  In addition, the “Personnel Responsibilities” section must be completed by each agency and must be kept on file along with all other required documentation as set forth in the manual.  The “Personnel Responsibilities” section, which addresses the agency protocols necessary to ensure a successful testing program, will be reviewed at each site visit.  Agencies are expected to keep this document current. We hope this manual will provide you with a strong foundation on which to monitor the quality of your testing program and procedures.

Attachments for the Rapid HIV Testing QA Manual:


Last Updated: 03-12-2014

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